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Posts Tagged ‘Economics’


Someone, somewhere, has proclaimed this Free Speech Pulpit Freedom Sunday (see what happens when you blog after getting up at 3 am- this was the least of my worries). People do that- declare a Sunday for their causes. It can be good to move us to focus prayer on particular issues like abortion, adoption, and the persecuted church.

Free Speech Sunday is a new one, at least to me. Sometimes I feel like I live in a cave. You’d think I wasn’t connected to the internet by an umbilical cord.

The purpose, as I understand it, of Free Speech Pulpit Freedom Sunday is to recognize what the IRS says a church can and cannot say. My understanding of the tax code (I am not an accountant, and getting one’s opinion on the tax code is about as helpful as asking a roomful of theologians a question) is that churches can address political issues, but not lobby for particular candidates. That this law is not fairly applied, from my opinion, is not the point. Actually, it is the point in terms of the intention of the day. Some use this fear of removing 501(c)3 status from conservative churches to silence them. But churches can talk politics, according to the law. We can say if a candidate’s position on abortion or marriage is immoral. We can say if the candidates break the 9th commandment (oh, boy do they do that early and often). We are on less solid ground when discussing the economic theory of the candidates (I have strong opinions on this matter, having a degree in economics, but that is not the same as comparing someone to a biblical standard on truth-telling in campaigning, or killing babies.

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One of the problems with how the “financial crisis” is being handled is the false notion that their is only one solution- one which expands the government’s involvement in ways that will create a bigger government and less personal accountability.

Financial Advisor Dave Ramsey lays out a different solution, which makes sense to those of us who want smaller government (and less corruption).  In 2004, the conservatives tried to address these problems but leading “progressives” like Barney Frank told us that “there was no evidence of financial unsoundness”, and that it was a hatchet-job on a Clinton advisor.  Why trust people like Frank to fix a problem they ignored for years?  Anyway, follow the link to Dave Ramsey’s Common Sense Fix since the WordPress editor keeps messing it up.

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